Our Research Unit actively works to inform and engage with criminal justice and social care partners to share emerging evidence.

The research we produce is regularly featured in leading sector-based publications.

Restorative justice

Restorative justice

Evaluating restorative justice to prevent crime and help people achieve their full potential.

Through in-depth interviews with participants and facilitators, our research looks at how we can build on positive outcomes to reduce reoffending and improve victims’ wellbeing.

Restorative Justice: Enabling Communication, Repairing Harm

County lines victims

County lines victims

County Lines is a growing issue in the UK, trapping children in a cycle of crime.

Playing our part in tackling this form of modern slavery, our research is helping to support the development of more interventions to ensure children are given the support and opportunities they need to rebuild their lives.

County lines – literature review

Remote probation supervision: Getting the balance right

Remote probation supervision: Getting the balance right

Our Research team writes about the pros and cons of remote supervision following new research with the University of Cambridge Institute of Criminology.

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The cost of empathy: Women who supervise women on probation – September 2020

The cost of empathy: Women who supervise women on probation – September 2020

An article for the Probation Quarterly about the impact of women working with women offenders.

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The demands of delivering a women-led probation service – November 2020

The demands of delivering a women-led probation service – November 2020

Senior Researcher Kerry Ellis Devitt shines a light on our latest research about the roles of women leads in the probation service in her guest blog for Russel Webster.

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Doing time on probation: Some experiences of family members – June 2020

Doing time on probation: Some experiences of family members – June 2020

Senior Researcher David Coley looks at families’ experiences of supporting a loved one on probation for the Probation Quarterly.

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Domestic abuse

Domestic abuse

The increase in domestic abuse during the pandemic is a cause for concern for our society as a whole. We are delivering interventions that aim to curb this terrible crime.

With domestic abuse causing victims long-term mental and physical trauma, our research looks at how to break down barriers so organisations are armed with the knowledge to prevent this type of abuse from happening.

Domestic abuse in Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic Groups
Domestic abuse evidence review
Domestic abuse in LGBTQ+ communities
FF1: Domestic abuse during coronavirus
Domestic abuse and COVID-19

COVID-19 and the impact on probation and the wider society

COVID-19 and the impact on probation and the wider society

The pandemic means the criminal justice system needs to think better and smarter to respond to offenders needs and we are in the best position to do so.

To address crime in this new era, we look at what’s changed and the best ways to respond as restrictions alter how we work.

Fact file 1: Domestic abuse during coronavirus
Fact file 2: Coronavirus and crime trends
Fact file 3: Mental health and coronavirus
Remote supervision, getting the balance right

Social inclusion and probation in the wider society

Social inclusion and probation in the wider society

Families and communities play a significant role in supporting a person to make better life choices so that they break away from their criminal past.

Understanding and reviewing social inclusion issues, our research makes recommendations to improve the effectiveness of future probation practice.

Family involvement in probation work

Supervision, wellbeing and organisational issues

Supervision, wellbeing and organisational issues

Enabling and motivating our people, we are best equipped to help reduce reoffending.

Evaluating organisational processes, we help to shape management structures and encourage staff development. Through interviews with practitioners, our recent research makes recommendations on how to improve staff supervision practice and make the women-led role more sustainable.

Probation staff supervision: Valuing me time in congested spaces
Delivering an effective women-led probation service